CNWL

Sexual Health Services

Important information for patients: Shortages of Hepatitis A and B vaccines

There are national shortages of hepatitis A and B vaccines. Sexual health clinics are putting measures in place to make sure that vaccines are preserved for those at highest risk.

Hepatitis A vaccine

  • Group 1: We will prioritise vaccines for this group:
    - Men who have sex with men who have had sexual contact with someone with hepatitis A
    - People at risk (For example, people who inject drugs) who have liver disease
  • Group 2: Depending on supplies, we will offer the vaccine to men who have sex with men if they are non-immune (you will need a blood test to check this first) and at-risk (sexually active with multiple partners), people who inject drugs, people living with HIV and people with hepatitis B or C
  • If you have had a single dose of vaccine, the second dose can be given up to five years later so we will not recall you for a second dose at six months as you may have been advised previously.
  • We may offer vaccine if you have had sexual contact with someone with hepatitis A.

Hepatitis B vaccine

  • We will offer the vaccine if you are at high risk and not immune with a three-dose course
  • If a hepatitis B vaccine would normally be given but you are low risk then this will be deferred. For example, for men who have sex with men but only have one partner who does not have hepatitis B
  • If you are due a booster this may be deferred
  • You will be prioritised for a hepatitis B vaccine if:
    - If you have had sexual contact with someone with acute (early) hepatitis B. In this situation you will have been contacted by a clinic asking you to attend
    - If you are the partner of someone with hepatitis B. We will check your immunity first
    - If you have had a needle-stick injury
  • If you have attended a clinic because you have been sexually assaulted.

For more information about the vaccine shortage, please read the guidance from Public Health England. Open Public Health England’s guidance

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